Advertisement
JOGC

The Safety of Home Birth

      During the 20th century, in most well-resourced countries, giving birth moved out of the home and into the hospital. In that same period, a dramatic decrease in the rate of both perinatal and maternal mortality occurred, and it is easy to see why many people associate these improved outcomes for women and their infants with giving birth in a hospital. Although the plethora of studies reporting on home birth have frequently been criticized for a variety of methodological limitations, a recent Cochrane review points to a few well-designed studies
      • Olsen O.
      • Clausen J.A.
      Planned hospital birth versus planned home birth.
      that can be used to inform our understanding of the role of hospital birth in improving maternal and newborn outcomes and to determine whether the relationship observed in the 1900s is one of causation or mere association. A systematic review is in progress to do just that.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Reitsma A.
      • Thorpe J.
      • Brunton G.
      • Kaufman K.
      Protocol: systematic review and meta-analyses of birth outcomes for women who intend at the onset of labour to give birth at home compared to women of low obstetrical risk who intend to give birth in hospital.
      In the meantime, in December 2015 two additional studies reporting on home births were published in highly regarded journals: a Canadian study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal reported on > 18 000 planned home births occurring in Ontario,
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Cappelletti A.
      • Reitsma A.H.
      • Simioni J.
      • Horne J.
      • McGregor C.
      • et al.
      Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.
      and a study from the United States in The New England Journal of Medicine reported on 3408 planned out-of-hospital births, including 1968 home births and 2440 births in birthing centres, in the state of Oregon.
      • Snowden J.M.
      • Tilden E.L.
      • Snyder J.
      • Quigley B.
      • Caughey A.B.
      • Cheng Y.W.
      Planned out-of-hospital birth and birth outcomes.
      The authors of both studies (I was first author of the Canadian study) stated that their findings are reassuring; however, the Ontario study found no difference in perinatal mortality when comparing home and hospital birth outcomes, whereas the Oregon study showed a two-fold increase in perinatal mortality. What can we take away from these studies? Why are the findings different? What do women need to know about birth out of a hospital? Which results are relevant to practice? Findings presented in both articles may be valid, but they are not generalizable outside their own setting.
      It is significant that the perinatal mortality outcomes of the Ontario study are so different from those in the Oregon study. The meta-analysis included in the report of the Ontario study included over 18 000 home births and reported a perinatal mortality rate of 1.15/1000 among births planned at home compared with 0.94/1000 in low-risk births planned for a hospital and attended by midwives.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Cappelletti A.
      • Reitsma A.H.
      • Simioni J.
      • Horne J.
      • McGregor C.
      • et al.
      Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.
      The Oregon study included 3408 out-of-hospital births and found a perinatal mortality rate of 3.9/1000 compared with an in-hospital rate of 1.8/1000.
      • Snowden J.M.
      • Tilden E.L.
      • Snyder J.
      • Quigley B.
      • Caughey A.B.
      • Cheng Y.W.
      Planned out-of-hospital birth and birth outcomes.
      This difference is worth considering.
      The perinatal mortality rate in the hospital birth group in the Oregon study (1.8/1000) was nearly double the rate in the Ontario study (0.94/1000). This difference may be explained by the fact that the authors of the Oregon study used all term singleton vertex births born in Oregon during the study period as comparators and used statistical methods to adjust for differences in risk.
      • Snowden J.M.
      • Tilden E.L.
      • Snyder J.
      • Quigley B.
      • Caughey A.B.
      • Cheng Y.W.
      Planned out-of-hospital birth and birth outcomes.
      But we know that even among the relatively low-risk population included as the hospital birth cohort, a significant number of women and infants who were at higher risk were included, thus potentially overestimating the perinatal outcomes associated with a planned hospital birth in Oregon. In the Ontario study, on the other hand, we were able to compare “apples with apples,” in that the planned hospital births were all to women with low-risk pregnancies who were attended while giving birth by the same group of midwives who provided care in the home birth group. This ensured comparability of the home and hospital cohorts for that study, in that women with low-risk pregnancies and birth attendants were the same, and only the planned place for giving birth was different.
      Another observation from the pooled Ontario data was that the rate of perinatal mortality among women in Ontario planning a home birth with midwives (1.15/1000) was not different from that of women planning a hospital birth and attended by the same midwives (0.94/1000). However, in Oregon the perinatal mortality rate for planned out-of-hospital births was more than double the rate for planned hospital births (3.9/1000 vs. 1.8/1000, respectively). The authors of the Oregon study emphasize that although this finding is statistically significant, it is a small absolute difference. However, the perinatal mortality rate for out-of-hospital births in Oregon was more than three times as high as the rate among Ontario women. So, why are we seeing differences between these two studies, reporting on the same “intervention?”
      A careful examination of the report from the Oregon study reveals that organization of care for planned out-of-hospital birth in Oregon is quite different from that in Ontario, including who is giving birth in an out-of-hospital setting, who is attending these births, and the mechanisms in place to facilitate transfer of care when required. In the Ontario study, registered midwives attended both planned home births and planned hospital births. In addition to regulated midwives, in the Oregon study a variety of other care providers attended births at home, including naturopaths (19%), midwives without recognized credentials (13%), and family members (4%). It is unclear what experience these care providers had for attendance at birth—and specifically at home birth, which requires particular skill in screening potential candidates. Particular skill also is required for determining what circumstances require transfer to a hospital and when—that is, with enough time to intervene effectively.
      Information about how out-of-hospital birth is integrated as part of the maternity care system in Oregon was not provided in the report of the Oregon study. The relatively low rate of transfer to a hospital from outside (16.5%) compared with the rate in the Ontario study (25%), the inclusion of women with higher obstetrical risk (including a higher proportion of women with post-dates pregnancies, grand multiparas, women with gestational diabetes, and women with hypertension) in the out-of-hospital setting, and the variety of regulated and non-regulated care providers attending home births suggest that home birth is not well-integrated into the Oregon health care system. This is in contrast to countries such as England, the Netherlands, and Canada, where reassuring outcomes associated with home birth are reported.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Cappelletti A.
      • Reitsma A.H.
      • Simioni J.
      • Horne J.
      • McGregor C.
      • et al.
      Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.

      College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Available at: http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Accessed on February 1, 2016.

      • Brocklehurst P.
      • Hardy P.
      • Hollowell J.
      • Linsell L.
      • Macfarlane A.
      • McCourt C.
      • et al.
      Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
      Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
      • de Jonge A.
      • Geerts C.C.
      • van der Goes B.Y.
      • Mol B.W.
      • Buitendijk S.E.
      • Nijhuis J.G.
      Perinatal mortality and morbidity up to 28 days after birth among 743 070 low-risk planned home and hospital births: a cohort study based on three merged national perinatal databases.
      In these jurisdictions, the conduct of home birth is governed by guidelines including, for example, who should consider giving birth at home, required qualifications for attendants at home births, and equipment that should be brought to the home.
      • Janssen P.
      • Saxell L.
      • Page L.
      • Klein M.
      • Liston R.
      • Lee S.
      Outcomes of planned home birth with registered midwife versus planned hospital birth with midwife or physician.
      A final and potentially important contrast between these two studies is that the number of self-paying patients (typically women without health insurance) in the Oregon study was much higher in the out-of-hospital group than in the planned hospital birth group, and specifically in the home birth group, for which nearly 50% of women were self-paying. This suggests that the decision to have a home birth, and to transfer to a hospital only if necessary, may be determined in part by financial circumstances rather than suitability to give birth in an out-of-hospital setting.
      The outcomes for women planning out-of-hospital birth were similar in the two studies in terms of the significantly lower likelihood of experiencing obstetrical intervention among women planning home birth. This might be explained in part by the self-selected nature of the cohorts. Women who plan to give birth at home (or in birthing centres) may be more confident about actually giving birth, may have previous positive experiences to build on, and may be more determined to avoid interventions.
      Nevertheless, the possibility that the home (or out-of-hospital) setting provides a more supportive environment for the very personal act of giving birth, and leads to a decreased need for intervention, cannot be ruled out.
      We can conclude that the findings in both these studies are not generalizable beyond the health systems in which they were performed. The message for physicians, midwives, families, and policy makers in the United States is this: there is a clear need for improved access to a high-quality system for out-of-hospital births, and in particular for home births, including the availability of well-qualified and experienced home birth attendants who have suitable access to hospital facilities and easily facilitated transfer of care to appropriate obstetrical services when required. This likely cannot be accomplished without removing financial barriers to giving birth in a hospital.
      The message for Canadian physicians, midwives, families, and policy makers is this: in provinces in which midwifery is regulated, and home birth is a part of that regulation, home birth is well-integrated into the health care system. This has resulted in perinatal and neonatal outcomes for women planning home birth that are not different from those for women planning hospital births; however, women planning home births can anticipate lower rates of obstetrical intervention. The Canadian experience of home birth is similar to that described in the European studies in both organization and outcomes.

      College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Available at: http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Accessed on February 1, 2016.

      • Brocklehurst P.
      • Hardy P.
      • Hollowell J.
      • Linsell L.
      • Macfarlane A.
      • McCourt C.
      • et al.
      Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
      Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
      Based on these studies, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines from the United Kingdom

      National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Intrapartum care for healthy women and their babies during childbirth (Clinical Guideline 109). Available at: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg190. Accessed on February 1, 2016.

      direct health care providers to discuss home birth as an option for all women with low-risk pregnancies.
      Au cours du 20e siècle, dans la plupart des pays bien nantis, l’accouchement est passé du domicile à l’hôpital. Durant la même période, on a observé une réduction spectaculaire du taux de mortalité périnatale et maternelle : il est donc facile de déterminer la raison pour laquelle tant de gens associent l’amélioration de ces résultats, pour la femme et son nouveau-né, à l’accouchement en milieu hospitalier. Une pléthore d’études sur l’accouchement à domicile a fréquemment suscité des critiques en raison de leurs différentes contraintes méthodologiques. Dernièrement, une revue systématique Cochrane a fait néanmoins ressortir quelques études bien conçues
      • Olsen O.
      • Clausen J.A.
      Planned hospital birth versus planned home birth.
      qui peuvent servir à éclairer notre compréhension du rôle de l’accouchement à l’hôpital dans l’amélioration des résultats cliniques chez la mère et le nouveau-né, et à déterminer si le lien établi au 20e siècle en est un de causalité ou de simple association. Un examen systématique se concentre uniquement sur cet aspect à l’heure actuelle.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Reitsma A.
      • Thorpe J.
      • Brunton G.
      • Kaufman K.
      Protocol: systematic review and meta-analyses of birth outcomes for women who intend at the onset of labour to give birth at home compared to women of low obstetrical risk who intend to give birth in hospital.
      Pendant ce temps, en décembre 2015, on a publié deux autres études sur les accouchements à domicile dans deux revues scientifiques de grande réputation. La première, une étude canadienne publiée dans le Journal de l’Association médicale canadienne, porte sur plus de 18 000 accouchements planifiés ayant eu lieu à domicile en Ontario.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Cappelletti A.
      • Reitsma A.H.
      • Simioni J.
      • Horne J.
      • McGregor C.
      • et al.
      Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.
      La seconde, une étude américaine publiée dans The New England Journal of Medicine, porte sur 3 408 accouchements planifiés ayant eu lieu hors du milieu hospitalier, soit 1 968 accouchements à domicile et 2 440 accouchements en maison de naissance, dans l’État de l’Oregon.
      • Snowden J.M.
      • Tilden E.L.
      • Snyder J.
      • Quigley B.
      • Caughey A.B.
      • Cheng Y.W.
      Planned out-of-hospital birth and birth outcomes.
      Les auteurs des deux études (j’étais l’auteure principale de l’étude canadienne) ont qualifié leurs résultats de rassurants. Cependant, l’étude menée en Ontario n’a permis d’observer aucune différence sur le plan de la mortalité périnatale, lorsqu’on compare les résultats des accouchements à domicile à ceux des accouchements en milieu hospitalier, alors que l’étude menée en Oregon a révélé un taux de mortalité périnatale multiplié par deux. Que pouvons-nous conclure de ces études? Pourquoi les résultats diffèrent-ils? Que doivent savoir les femmes sur l’accouchement hors du milieu hospitalier? Quels résultats revêtent de la pertinence pour la pratique? Malgré la validité des conclusions présentées dans les deux articles, il est impossible de les généraliser hors de leur contexte.
      Il importe de faire remarquer que le taux de mortalité périnatale dégagé par l’étude menée en Ontario diffère nettement de celui établi par l’étude menée en Oregon. La méta-analyse intégrée au rapport de l’étude menée en Ontario englobe plus de 18 000 accouchements à domicile. Elle révèle un taux de mortalité périnatale de 1,15/1 000 parmi les accouchements prévus à domicile, en comparaison de 0,94/1 000 parmi les accouchements à faible risque planifiés à l’hôpital et assistés par une sage-femme.

      College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Disponible : http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Consulté le 1er février 2016.

      L’étude menée en Oregon, qui englobe 3 408 accouchements hors du milieu hospitalier, indique un taux de mortalité périnatale de 3,9/1 000, comparativement à un taux de 1,8/1 000 en milieu hospitalier.
      • Brocklehurst P.
      • Hardy P.
      • Hollowell J.
      • Linsell L.
      • Macfarlane A.
      • McCourt C.
      • et al.
      Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
      Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
      Il convient donc de s’interroger sur cet écart.
      Dans le cas de l’étude menée en Oregon, le taux de mortalité périnatale établi pour le groupe de femmes ayant accouché à l’hôpital (1,8/1 000) équivaut presque au double du taux calculé lors de l’étude menée en Ontario (0,94/1 000). D’une part, cet écart peut s’expliquer par le fait que les auteurs de l’étude menée en Oregon se sont appuyés sur un facteur de comparaison spécifique, à savoir l’ensemble des accouchements d’un fœtus par le vertex ayant eu lieu à terme en Oregon, durant la période de leurs travaux. Ces chercheurs ont également eu recours à des méthodes statistiques afin de neutraliser les effets des différences en matière de risque.
      • de Jonge A.
      • Geerts C.C.
      • van der Goes B.Y.
      • Mol B.W.
      • Buitendijk S.E.
      • Nijhuis J.G.
      Perinatal mortality and morbidity up to 28 days after birth among 743 070 low-risk planned home and hospital births: a cohort study based on three merged national perinatal databases.
      Toutefois, nous savons que, parmi la population exposée à un risque relativement faible qui formait la cohorte des sujets ayant accouché à l’hôpital, on a intégré un nombre significatif de femmes et de nouveau-nés exposés à un risque plus élevé. Ainsi, on a peut-être surestimé les résultats périnataux liés à l’accouchement prévu en milieu hospitalier en Oregon. Pour ce qui concerne l’étude menée en Ontario, d’autre part, nous avons pu « comparer des pommes avec des pommes ». En fait, les accouchements planifiés à l’hôpital avaient tous trait à des femmes présentant une grossesse à faible risque. Ces sujets ont obtenu l’assistance du groupe de sages-femmes qui ont également prodigué leurs soins à la cohorte de femmes ayant accouché à domicile. Cet aspect a assuré la comparabilité des deux cohortes de cette étude, soit celles des femmes ayant accouché à domicile et des femmes ayant accouché en milieu hospitalier : les femmes qui présentaient une grossesse à faible risque et les accoucheuses étaient les mêmes, et seul le lieu prévu pour l’accouchement était différent.
      Les données totalisées lors de l’étude menée en Ontario nous ont permis de faire une autre observation : le taux de mortalité périnatale, chez les Ontariennes ayant prévu un accouchement à domicile assisté par une sage-femme (1,15/1 000), ne diffère aucunement du taux dégagé auprès des Ontariennes ayant prévu un accouchement à l’hôpital assisté par l’une des sages-femmes du même groupe (0,94/1 000). En Oregon, cependant, le taux de mortalité périnatale calculé pour les accouchements prévus hors du milieu hospitalier équivaut à plus du double du taux lié aux accouchements planifiés à l’hôpital (3,9/1 000 contre 1,8/1 000, respectivement). Les auteurs de l’étude menée en Oregon insistent sur le fait que, même si ce résultat est statistiquement significatif, il ne s’agit que d’une faible différence absolue. Pourtant, le taux de mortalité périnatale établi pour les accouchements réalisés hors du milieu hospitalier en Oregon équivaut à plus du triple du taux dégagé chez les Ontariennes. Pourquoi donc constatons-nous des différences entre ces deux études, qui portent sur la même « intervention »?
      Un examen minutieux du rapport de l’étude menée en Oregon révèle que l’organisation des soins relatifs aux accouchements prévus hors du milieu hospitalier diffère passablement de la structure établie en Ontario. Ces différences ont trait aux femmes qui accouchent hors du milieu hospitalier, aux personnes qui les assistent et aux mécanismes instaurés pour faciliter le transfert des soins, le cas échéant. D’après l’étude menée en Ontario, des sages-femmes autorisées sont intervenues lors des accouchements prévus à domicile et des accouchements planifiés en milieu hospitalier. Outre les sages-femmes autorisées, l’étude menée en Oregon révèle que différents prestataires de soins ont assisté les femmes ayant accouché à domicile, notamment des naturopathes (19 %), des sages-femmes sans titre professionnel reconnu (13 %), ainsi que des membres de la famille (4 %). Le rapport n’indique pas clairement le genre d’expérience acquise par ces prestataires de soins pour intervenir lors des accouchements, en particulier les accouchements à domicile, qui exigent des compétences particulières en matière de sélection des candidates potentielles. Il faut également posséder des compétences particulières pour déterminer les circonstances exigeant le transport vers un centre hospitalier, ainsi que le moment auquel ce transport doit avoir lieu (c.-à-d. pour assurer le temps nécessaire à la mise en œuvre d’une intervention efficace).
      Le rapport de l’étude menée en Oregon ne fournit aucun renseignement sur la façon dont les accouchements hors du milieu hospitalier sont intégrés au système des soins de maternité de cet État. Le taux relativement faible de transports vers un centre hospitalier hors région (16,5 %), comparativement à celui établi par l’étude menée en Ontario (25 %), l’inclusion de femmes présentant un risque obstétrical accru (proportion plus élevée de grossesses post-terme, de grandes multiparités, de cas de diabète gestationnel et de cas d’hypertension) et accouchant hors du milieu hospitalier, et la grande variété de prestataires de soins réglementés et non réglementés qui interviennent lors des accouchements à domicile semblent indiquer que cet acte n’est pas bien intégré au système de santé de l’Oregon. Cette situation contraste avec celle que l’on constate dans des pays comme l’Angleterre, les Pays-Bas et le Canada, qui déclarent des résultats rassurants quant aux accouchements à domicile.
      • Hutton E.K.
      • Cappelletti A.
      • Reitsma A.H.
      • Simioni J.
      • Horne J.
      • McGregor C.
      • et al.
      Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.

      College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Disponible : http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Consulté le 1er février 2016.

      • Brocklehurst P.
      • Hardy P.
      • Hollowell J.
      • Linsell L.
      • Macfarlane A.
      • McCourt C.
      • et al.
      Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
      Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
      • de Jonge A.
      • Geerts C.C.
      • van der Goes B.Y.
      • Mol B.W.
      • Buitendijk S.E.
      • Nijhuis J.G.
      Perinatal mortality and morbidity up to 28 days after birth among 743 070 low-risk planned home and hospital births: a cohort study based on three merged national perinatal databases.
      Dans ces territoires de compétence, des lignes directrices régissent la conduite de ces accouchements. À titre d’exemple, ces lignes directrices déterminent les catégories de femmes qui peuvent envisager de donner naissance chez elles, les qualifications exigées de la part des accoucheuses, ainsi que le matériel à apporter à domicile.
      • Janssen P.
      • Saxell L.
      • Page L.
      • Klein M.
      • Liston R.
      • Lee S.
      Outcomes of planned home birth with registered midwife versus planned hospital birth with midwife or physician.
      Enfin, il existe un contraste potentiellement important entre ces deux études. Dans le cadre de l’étude menée en Oregon, le nombre de patientes qui ont financé leur accouchement (et n’avaient pas d’assurance maladie, en général) a été nettement plus élevé au sein du groupe ayant prévu un accouchement hors du milieu hospitalier (et plus particulièrement au sein du groupe ayant accouché à domicile : près de 50 % des femmes ont financé cet acte) qu’au sein du groupe ayant planifié un accouchement à l’hôpital. Cette constatation laisse entendre que la décision d’accoucher à domicile (et de n’être transportée vers un centre hospitalier qu’au besoin) serait motivée en partie par la situation financière, plutôt que par la pertinence de donner naissance hors du milieu hospitalier.
      Les deux études ont permis de dégager des résultats similaires pour ce qui est femmes ayant planifié un accouchement hors du milieu hospitalier, soit une probabilité significativement réduite de subir une intervention obstétricale. Cette situation pourrait s’expliquer en partie par la nature autosélectionnée des cohortes. Les femmes qui prévoient accoucher à domicile (ou dans une maison de naissance) peuvent éprouver une plus grande confiance à l’égard de cet acte, en fait. Elles peuvent également se reposer sur des expériences antérieures vécues positivement, dans certains cas, et se montrer plus déterminées à éviter les interventions obstétricales.
      Néanmoins, nous ne pouvons pas éliminer la possibilité selon laquelle le domicile (ou les autres établissements hors du milieu hospitalier) constitue un environnement plus favorable à l’acte très personnel d’accoucher et qu’il réduit la nécessité d’une intervention obstétricale.
      Nous pouvons conclure qu’il est impossible de généraliser les résultats de ces deux études au-delà des systèmes de santé où elles ont eu lieu. Voici notre message aux médecins, aux sages-femmes, aux familles et aux décideurs des États-Unis : de toute évidence, il est nécessaire d’améliorer l’accessibilité à un système d’accouchement hors du milieu hospitalier de grande qualité, en particulier pour les accouchements à domicile. En outre, il faut assurer la disponibilité de sages-femmes qualifiées et expérimentées, qui bénéficient d’un accès convenable aux établissements hospitaliers et peuvent faciliter le transfert des soins vers les services obstétricaux appropriés, si nécessaire. Il est peu probable que l’on accomplisse ces objectifs sans éliminer les obstacles financiers à l’accouchement en milieu hospitalier.
      Voici notre message aux médecins, aux sages-femmes, aux familles et aux décideurs du Canada : dans les provinces où la profession de sage-femme est réglementée et où l’accouchement à domicile s’inscrit dans cette réglementation, cet acte est bien intégré au système de soins de santé. Chez les femmes qui prévoient un accouchement à domicile, cette situation engendre des résultats périnataux et néonataux qui ne diffèrent nullement de ceux établis pour les femmes qui planifient un accouchement en milieu hospitalier. Cependant, les femmes qui envisagent un accouchement à domicile peuvent s’attendre à un plus faible taux d’intervention obstétricale. L’expérience de l’accouchement à domicile au Canada se révèle similaire à celle qui est décrite par les études européennes, sur les plans de l’organisation et des résultats.

      College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Disponible : http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Consulté le 1er février 2016.

      • Brocklehurst P.
      • Hardy P.
      • Hollowell J.
      • Linsell L.
      • Macfarlane A.
      • McCourt C.
      • et al.
      Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
      Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
      D’après ces études, les lignes directrices du National Institute for Health and Care Excellence du Royaume-Uni

      National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Intrapartum care for healthy women and their babies during childbirth (Clinical Guideline 109). Disponible : www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg190. Consulté le 1er février 2016.

      recommandent aux professionnels des soins de santé de considérer l’accouchement à domicile comme une option offerte à toutes les femmes présentant une grossesse à faible risque.

      References

        • Olsen O.
        • Clausen J.A.
        Planned hospital birth versus planned home birth.
        Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012; : CD000352
        • Hutton E.K.
        • Reitsma A.
        • Thorpe J.
        • Brunton G.
        • Kaufman K.
        Protocol: systematic review and meta-analyses of birth outcomes for women who intend at the onset of labour to give birth at home compared to women of low obstetrical risk who intend to give birth in hospital.
        Syst Rev. 2014; 3: 55
        • Hutton E.K.
        • Cappelletti A.
        • Reitsma A.H.
        • Simioni J.
        • Horne J.
        • McGregor C.
        • et al.
        Outcomes associated with planned place of birth among women with low-risk pregnancies.
        CMAJ. 2016; 188: E80-E90
        • Snowden J.M.
        • Tilden E.L.
        • Snyder J.
        • Quigley B.
        • Caughey A.B.
        • Cheng Y.W.
        Planned out-of-hospital birth and birth outcomes.
        N Engl J Med. 2015; 373: 2642-2753
      1. College of Midwives of British Columbia. Registrant’s handbook: home birth standards. Available at: http://cmbc.bc.ca/standards-policies-forms/standards-policies-and-forms/. Accessed on February 1, 2016.

        • Brocklehurst P.
        • Hardy P.
        • Hollowell J.
        • Linsell L.
        • Macfarlane A.
        • McCourt C.
        • et al.
        • Birthplace in England Collaborative Group
        Perinatal and maternal outcomes by planned place of birth for healthy women with low risk pregnancies: the Birthplace in England national prospective cohort study.
        BMJ. 2011; 343: d7400
        • de Jonge A.
        • Geerts C.C.
        • van der Goes B.Y.
        • Mol B.W.
        • Buitendijk S.E.
        • Nijhuis J.G.
        Perinatal mortality and morbidity up to 28 days after birth among 743 070 low-risk planned home and hospital births: a cohort study based on three merged national perinatal databases.
        BJOG. 2015; 122: 720-728
        • Janssen P.
        • Saxell L.
        • Page L.
        • Klein M.
        • Liston R.
        • Lee S.
        Outcomes of planned home birth with registered midwife versus planned hospital birth with midwife or physician.
        CMAJ. 2009; 181: 377-383
      2. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Intrapartum care for healthy women and their babies during childbirth (Clinical Guideline 109). Available at: www.nice.org.uk/guidance/cg190. Accessed on February 1, 2016.